Understanding Mental Health is exactly like Reading the Stars

UNDERSTANDING YOUR MENTAL HEALTH IS LIKE READING THE STARS

 

I want you to imagine the sky on a clear, summer night. You look up and see the twinkling stars. But then, your friend comes along, points at the sky and says, “Look there’s Orion, the Hunter, with his belt and shield and club!” You follow their finger, you try to see what it’s pointing at. But all you see are stars splattered across the sky. “Don’t you see it? Look for the belt!” says your friend. You rub your eyes and try… and try… and try… until you finally see three bright stars at equal distance apart–that’s the Belt of Orion. Then, your friend shows you a star chart of the Orion constellation, and you see how these stars connect to other stars to form the figure of a man, with a belt, holding a club with one hand and a shield with the other. You look back up at the sky… and now you see it! He’s right there! The stars are now connected.

From that night onward, every time you look up at the stars, the constellation of Orion is clearly defined.

Mental Health is just like this analogy. Oftentimes, we have small mental lows, blows, triggers, and frustrations that we don’t easily identify as a mental illness. Think, for now, of these as the stars–individual, small, and distant. But when you really take the time to connect the stars, on your own, then with friends and family, and finally with a therapist or psychologist, a “constellation” will appear in the form of a diagnosed and treatable mental illness.

Explaining your mental health can be like pointing at the stars and expecting others to immediately see a constellation. This goes to show that a mental illness is composed of a series of recurring triggers, episodes and suffering–just like a constellation is composed of many, many stars.

When you really take the time to connect the stars, on your own, then with friends and family, and finally with a therapist or psychologist, a “constellation” will appear in the form of a diagnosed and treatable mental illness.

So how can you explain your mental health to someone who can’t immediately see the constellation? Well, you could begin by addressing your biggest triggers first. For example, you might be unable to use your full voice when you must talk in front of a crowd; you might subconsciously hide behind your friends or family when you are in public; and you might get critized for not speaking when everyone else around you is engaged in a conversation. If you connect these three triggers or situations, and talk to a mental health expert, you might learn that you could have a form of social anxiety.

NOTE: this is only an example, and should not be taken as an actual diagnosis!

So if you follow this constellation analogy, you can gradually connect everything to get a clearer overview of what your mental health looks like, and be more comfortable and confident in explaining it. Mental health is not something everyone easily identifies, because the reality is that mental health only appears when a series of patterns are connected. So don’t ignore the small patterns in your mood, behaviour and actions–these could be the three bright stars that connect your constellation.

So don’t ignore the small patterns in your mood, behaviour and actions–these could be the three bright stars that connect your constellation.

One way that SUINEWAI FASHION can help you in your journey is with our awesome apparel, which portray many aspects of mental health with relatable and catchy designs, which work as conversation starters. We know it’s not easy to talk about our mental health, so our t-shirts and hoodies take the first step for you, initiating the conversation with these awesome designs. With designs for Men and Women, from ADHD to Anxiety, you are sure to find one you relate to. We all deal with our mental health, so why not make it into a fashion statement?

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